Anti-Racism Reading Group #2: Theft of Black Wealth

In an effort to hold myself accountable to better anti-racism theory and practice, I’ve started hosting an anti-racism reading group for health practitioners in the Seattle area. In this series, I’d like to share both these readings and some of the discussion. You can read part one here. 

For the second meeting of the anti-racism reading group, we read part one of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ The Case For Reparations. In our first meeting, we discussed big-picture theory of race, so we followed that up by focusing in on particular racial project called redlining which had been a major contributor to both racial housing segregation and wealth inequality in America today. Continue reading “Anti-Racism Reading Group #2: Theft of Black Wealth”

Anti-Racism Reading Group #1: Racial Projects

In an effort to hold myself accountable to better anti-racism theory and practice, I’ve started hosting an anti-racism reading group for health practitioners in the Seattle area. In this series, I’d like to share both these readings and some of the discussion. 

For the first meeting of the anti-racism reading group, we read a selection from Racial Formation In The United States by Michael Omi and Howard Winant. You can download a PDF of this selection here.

In this section, the authors describe race as existing in the interaction between 1) social structures which organize society by race and 2) the cultural representations and experiences of race. Racial projects is the term given to the mediators of this interaction. Continue reading “Anti-Racism Reading Group #1: Racial Projects”

Doctors Against Deportation

This week, federal immigration agents in Texas stalked a 10 year old girl with cerebral palsy to the hospital where she was receiving emergency gall bladder surgery for a life-threatening condition. Taking advantage of this moment of vulnerability, they captured this girl at the hospital and have now imprisoned her at one of their loosely regulated detention facilities. Federal guidance lists health care settings as “sensitive locations” which are supposed to be protected from immigration raids because discouraging people from seeking needed medical care out of fear of predatory immigration agents is an attack on their health and safety.

As a doctor who believes that the value of a human being’s health and safety is not contingent on their documentation status but rather on their inherent human worth, I am appalled by the work of U.S. immigration agents who seems to be eternally at odds with my work to keep my fellow human beings safe and healthy.

Because of this, I want to take a moment to outline how I think medical professionals should interact with U.S. immigration agents in healthcare settings and to highlight the work of some amazing organizations in the Seattle area who are working to uphold the dignity of all people, regardless of documentation status.

Continue reading “Doctors Against Deportation”

Innovations In Primary Care #1: Introduction

As part of my family medicine residency training, I’m taking a month-long elective called Innovations in Primary Care. This month is an opportunity for primary care doctors from family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in Seattle to explore some of the different primary care models being trialed in the Seattle area and to use those experiences to fuel discussion about how primary care (and really, all medical care) can be improved in the United States.

Today was our first meeting, during which we gathered to collectively write an H&P for our current medical system. For those reading this who are not in medicine, the History and Physical or H&P is a semi-standardized note-writing structure that doctors use to describe the subjective and objective information about a patient’s health, assess why  the patient is experiencing illness, and describe the next steps we need to take (diagnostic tests and/or treatments) going forward. It’s a structured way of thinking about a patient that helps us be rigorous and methodical.

It was a gratifying process because each of the doctors at the table shared a passion for making our health care system better, but brought a different set of experiences and priorities to the conversation.

Some of the take-aways I had from this conversation are as follows (in no particular order):

  1. The insurance framework for paying for health care, while originally conceived to improve access to surgical services which would otherwise be prohibitively expensive to most people, was quickly recognized by doctors as a way to extract larger fees for patient care. After all, when a third party (the insurance company) pays the bills, people tolerate much higher fees even if the end result is steady rise in out-of-pocket costs for everyone. Doctors, hospitals, and pharmaceutical companies have abused this system so greedily under the previous usual-and-customary payment system that increasingly rigid cost-containment measures have had to be implemented to control costs. We now live in a society where the average doctor makes $294,000 per year–more than 98.9% of Americans–while medical bills bankrupt patients and health insurance cost suppresses wage growth. Recognizing and holding ourselves accountable to how capitalism in medicine has brought out the worst in us is necessary before we can even begin to conceptualize a new system.
  2. The costs of most important and effective interventions to improve health, including primary care, are recurring and predictable costs that are best paid for through public health funding, NOT through health insurance. Access to clean water, nutritious food, safe housing, and preventive medical care is necessary for All People at All Times.
  3. America fails to invest in public welfare programs because of racism. The idea of the racialized-and-thus-undeserving Other benefiting from public welfare programs (e.g. the racist specter of the Welfare Queen that Reagan so infamously promoted) is fundamentally intolerable to White America. We are comfortable with 1 in 7 people in the United States facing food insecurity if it means we can prevent one person from buying steak with food stamps. There is no justice without racial justice.
  4. Many participants are needed to transform our medical care system into a true health care system. While there are only physicians in this particular group, the real work requires public health professionals, community health workers, housing experts, policy wonks, political activists, artists, chefs, personal trainers, behavioralists, and many others to both design an implement a better system.

I’m looking forward to the experiences and conversations this month will bring, and I hope to walk away with greater insight into how I can be a better advocate for effective and equitable health care in this country.

Critical Race Theory in Medicine: A Reading List

Inspired by this letter by Jennifer Tsai and Ann Crawford-Roberts, I’m working on putting together a reading list to jump start conversation about Critical Race Theory in medicine at my family medicine residency. The goal of such a conversation is to develop a more effective anti-racism praxis in our medical system and our lives more generally. I’ll update this list as I get more recommendations. Please let me know if you have recommendations to add.

Professor Adrienne Keene’s open-access course in Critical Race Theory at Brown: Introduction to Critical Race Theory 2017

Recommended by Michelle Munyikwa
Recommended by Jeremy Levenson

If you are having trouble accessing any of these articles, let me know!

In support of Professor Tommy Curry

Associate Professor Tommy Curry at Texas A&M (my alma mater) is the latest academic targeted by White Supremacists in their campaign to silence scholars of race and racism.

Four years ago, in a podcast conversation about the movie Django, he gave a brief summary of scholarly work about the role of anti-White violence in the path of Black liberation. White Supremacist groups have now taken quotes out of context from that interview and are claiming that he was inciting racial violence.

Texas A&M President, Michael K. Young, found these White Supremacists’ argument compelling and decried Mr. Curry’s words as “in stark contrast to Aggie core values.”

I’ve signed this petition and am writing this now because I disagree with that assessment in the strongest terms. The Aggie honor code calls for us to “not lie, cheat, or steal, or tolerate those who do,” and yet the history of racial violence in America has been one of theft of Black people’s lives and livelihoods. If we are to live in this country as honorable Aggies, we must reject that path a form a new one. Doing so requires the thoughtful academic scholarship and leadership of people like Tommy Curry.

Why I wear a Black Lives Matter pin



This is the badge where I choose to display a Black Lives Matter pin. I wear this pin to work each day because I believe that Black Lives Matter is a message that is essential for all Americans to see and hear on a daily basis. I’ve distributed almost a hundred of these pins to my co-workers and every month I order more. It was brought to my attention that my employer has received anonymous complaints about seeing medical staff wearing these pins, so I wanted to clarify why I as a doctor make the choice to wear this pin.

Black Lives Matter became a prominent slogan during nationwide protests against police violence.  According to the federal Bureau of Justice Statistics, between 2003 and 2009 4,813 Americans died at the hands of police. Black people are disproportionately the victims of these police homicides, accounting for 32% of these deaths despite constituting only 12.6% of the population.

In this context, #BlackLivesMatter was used to remind the White American public that Tamir Rice, Sandra Bland, Freddie Gray, and Walter Scott are precious souls to be grieved, not mere statistics. However, the slogan gained a life of its own as a push back against the myriad ways in which Black life is denigrated in our country. It is a pinprick to the conscience meant to call attention to the cynicism with which too many of us receive news of the deaths of our Black neighbors.

This is a message that we healthcare professionals need to hear as we are all too often oblivious or callous to the enormous health disparities that exist between Black and White people in this country. A 2013 CDC report showed that rate of deaths from heart disease and stroke is 20% greater for Black people than White. That’s 6,942 deaths every year that could be prevented if racial inequality was addressed. The same report showed that the infant death rate is 130% greater for Black children than White. That’s 4,576 Black babies that don’t live to see their first birthdays because of racial disparity.

When I say that racism kills, I am speaking to these thousands of deaths that occur every year because of the racial injustice that permeates our nation. When I wear that pin, it’s because the deaths of four thousand Black babies every year is a tragedy and an injustice and it matters.

As a profession that is committed to preserving health and prolonging life, we have a duty to push back against all things that threaten the well-being of our patients. That is why I wear this pin and will continue to do so.

If you wish to take a stand in your workplace as well, I encourage you to order your own Black Lives Matter pin here:


EDIT 5/16/17: An earlier version of this post stated that “4,813 Americans died at the hands of police every year.” This has been corrected to state “between 2003 and 2009 4,813 Americans died at the hands of police.”